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Persons in Chinese History - Chen Jiao 陳矯

Periods of Chinese History
Chen Jiao 陳矯 (d. 237), courtesy name Jibi 季弼, was a high official of the early Wei period 曹魏 (220-265). His native town was Dongyang 東陽 in the commandery of Guangling 廣陵 (today's Xuyi 盱眙, Jiangsu) and worked in the local administration. When the warlord Sun Quan 孫權 besieged the city, Chen Jiao arranged the relief by an army of Cao Cao 曹操, and so prepared the heavy defeat of Sun Quan. Cao Cao made him cleark of the Minister of Works (sikong yuan 司空掾) and then governor (taishou 太守) of the commandery of Weijun 魏郡. He took particular care for jurisdiction and quickly solved a large amount of pending cases. Later on he participated in Cao Cao's campaign in the region of Hanzhong 漢中, and was thereafter promoted to the post of chief steward for writing (shangshu 尚書). When Cao Cao died, Chen Jiao advised his oldest son Cao Pi 曹丕 to immediately assume the royal title (king of Wei 魏) of his father rather than to await the consent of the emperor. Chen also arranged all administrative matters to ensure the smooth continuation of the Cao family's rule. When Cao Pi adopted the title of emperor (therefore known as Emperor Wen 魏文帝, r. 220-226)), Chen Jiao took over the Ministry of Personnel (libu 吏部) and was enfeoffed as Neighbourhood Marquis of Gaoling 高陵亭侯. He served as Director of the Imperial Secretariat (shangshu ling 尚書令), and after the accession to the throne of Emperor Ming 魏明帝 (r. 226-239 CE) he was made Township Marquis of Dongxiang 東鄉侯. His last (rather honorific) titles were palace attendant serving as Grand Master for Splending Happiness (shizhong guanglu dafu 侍中光祿大夫) and Minister of Education (situ 司徒). His posthumous title was Marquis Zhen 貞侯.

Source: Zhang Shunhui 張舜徽 (ed. 1992), Sanguozhi cidian 三國志辭典 (Jinan: Shandong jiaoyu chubanshe), p. 471.

June 2, 2016 © Ulrich Theobald · Mail
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